I’d like to take a minute to update you on the most current findings regarding a much discussed topic: Do mobile devices cause cancer? Information cited in this blog post comes from an article in the November issue of Women’s Health.

The National Cancer Institute has ruled mobile devices safe, but a growing number of independent researchers disagree. These independent experts point out that the FCC wireless regulations on cell phone safety are largely based on something called specific absorption rate (SAR) levels, or the rate at which our bodies absorb radiation. Most phones comply with the federal standards, but SAR monitors only thermal effects. Regarding these thermal effects, the article I cite in this blog states, sardonically, that “if the radiation from your phone isn’t cooking your brain, it’s regarded as safe.”  

Let’s look at RF levels instead

Note that mounting scientific evidence suggests that nonthermal radio frequency radiation (RF)—the invisible energy waves that connect cell phones to cell towers, and power numerous other everyday items—can damage our immune systems and alter our cellular makeup, even at intensities considered safe by the FCC.

“The problem is that RF can transfer energy waves into your body and disrupt its normal functioning,” explains Cindy Sage, an environmental consultant in Santa Barbara, California, who has studied radiation for 28 years. “Here’s why that’s crucial: Overwhelming evidence shows that RF can cause DNA damage, and DNA damage is a necessary precursor to cancer.”

From the 2010 Interphone study, the largest to date on RF exposure from mobile phones but largely based on lower cellphone usage in the ’90s, it appears the research has little bearing on today’s world. Now, 285 million Americans have mobile phones and 83 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds are “wired” all the time and often sleep with their cell phones next to their heads.  Yes, this is an alarming statistic and one that is not widely known.

Many European countries are considering banning cell phones for children under age 6 (RF penetrates little kids’ brains more easily), and France has already banned all wireless technology in some schools and many public places, notes physician and epidemiologist Samuel Milham, M.D., a leader in the growing field of electromagnetic research.

My Take

As the CEO for the Chris Elliott Fund and recipient of many reports citing environmental cancer dangers, I would add that these mobile device findings are alarming right along with the desire to see MORE  evidence-based research completed in this area. Most critical is to get solid research study findings into the hands of the public more quickly so we can all make informed decisions for ourselves and those we love.

In the meantime, it’s best to take simple precautions—and not just with mobile phones. The good news is that you don’t need to necessarily ditch your gadgets. The advice in this linked article tells us how we can remain plugged in—and stay healthy. I’ve thoughtfully reduced my “wireless” footprint and I encourage you to give it a try too! 

Blessings,  

Dellann